Safety Tips

Best GPS For Mountain Biking

When it comes to choosing a GPS bike navigation computer, several factors play a role. Let’s take a look at factors such as price, connectivity, the screen, GPS and Mapping options, and 3rd-party apps.

  • Price: Of course, price matters. Not everyone needs a bike computer with lots of functions and options. Often, a simple computer will meet your needs and requirements when climbing hilltops across America. For many cyclists and MTB riders, a compact, simple unit with just a black-and-white display that provides only basic metrics will do. More expensive units, however, have base maps, in-depth power metrics, interval timers, color touchscreens, and more connectivity options than you’ve ever dreamed of. Every bicycle computer, regardless of price, will provide basic data such as speed, time, and distance, but in general, the more you spend, the more functions and features you’ll get.
  • Connectivity: Then there is the element of connectivity. Even most bottom-end computers support Bluetooth or ANT+ connections to heart-rate monitors and cadence or speed sensors. Cheaper units, however, often don’t support power meters. Today, an increasing number of bike computers, also the cheaper models, start facilitating Bluetooth connections to smartphones for notifications, updates, and the like.

Bikes and Equipments

Required Cycling Equipment for safe biking tours

A cycling race may look quite simple and not as dangerous as other races, but for riders to stay safe, there’s a huge list of cycling equipment that they must be aware of and ready to use.

This sport is done on racing bicycles, also referred to as bikes. So among the most crucial things of all for safe races are the bicycles themselves and the bike gears.

Essential as well, besides the racing bicycle and the safety gear, are the riders’ clothes and shoes that should suit the weather, protect the riders from injuries, and avoid discomfort, especially on challenging hill climbs that are often so risky.

Bicycle or Bike?

Racing bicycles are also called bikes. As opposed to motorbikes, these types of bikes are manually driven. The riders power the bikes by pedaling and there’s no electrical or mechanical machinery involved or attached.

Racing bicycles are entirely human-powered and are critically important equipment to the riders. To be able to perform well in a safe manner, having the facing bike in perfect order is key.

Where to buy spinning shoes

While there may be a couple of hundred different pairs of shoes for spinning for us to choose from, we want to make sure we’re getting the best deal. Am I right? Of course, I am. We all love saving money and want to buy good spinning shoes at clearance prices. With these five retailers, you’re nearly guaranteed to walk away knowing that you got the best price.

What to choose… Road or MTB shoes? Laces or rather straps? In the following video, Simon is talking through a few of the key features you need to keep in mind when you set out to buy your next pair of spinning or cycling shoes.

Of course, Amazon is a no-brainer, you should always check them first when you want to buy anything for spinning. But I want to help you dig a little deeper than that. Here are five more to stores to check out.

The REI Garage

The Garage is REI’s shopping outlet. You’ll find a consistent 40% or more and they offer coupons all the time. At the time of this writing (August 2016) they are offering an additional 20% with the code REIGARAGE.

Advice for Hillclimbers – Rest and Diet

Rest

If you train hard, you must also rest hard. Some of the lunchtime riding group at work are perplexed by my riding habits. I may ride a pace they like in the winter or very early in the season, but as the season progress, my hard rides get harder, and my easy rides get easier. It doesn’t all get harder. You see, the harder you train, the more important recovery becomes, especially for somebody like me in their 40’s.

The lunch crowd likes neither end of my riding spectrum once winter passes. My hard is too hard, yet my easy is too easy. I often will do block training days, where two or three days in a row involve intensity work. Then I need two days of recovery. I rarely take days completely off, so I go out for short recovery rides and stretch afterward on my rest days.

The pace I ride at is one half my 30-minute power, which is roughly 60-65% of my max heart rate. This is a very easy pace and takes focus with HRM to keep it that easy  But if I go harder than this, I don’t recover as well, and go into my next intensity block with sore or tired legs. I find maximum adaptation is gained when doing intensity work on fresh legs.  For many riders, taking one or two days per week completely off the bicycle may be the best way to recover.