Six Gaps

The Six Gaps Bicycle Hill Climb Vermont

Whether you’re up to the challenge of your life or are just looking for a smaller one, you’ll find it all here in Vermont’s Green Mountains.

The Vermont Six Gaps is a ride that you can accomplish in one day or you can decide to do different parts of it instead. Most of it is paved and it has become extremely popular for bike enthusiasts from around the nation.

The air is fresh and crisp in this part of the country with spectacular mountain views and breathtaking scenery at every turn. Here is a brief description of the six various gaps.

You can check out various magazines and brochures about the area and the climb (though some are so complicated that you must really be good at understanding English grammar), but to truly appreciate them, you don’t need magazines, you’ll need to travel here yourself and ride these roads.

Lincoln

This is the big one. This is the gap that separates the highly skilled cyclists from the beginners. This is among the most challenging climbing trails in America and includes a 16% grade section that’s lasting for over a mile.

It is more than 4 miles long with an elevation spanning up to 1,800 feet with a sustained grade of 24% rearing its head at one point along the route.

Cycling Hill Climbs-New England and New York

Welcome to North East Cycling Climb Central. Here you will find detailed information about road cycling hill climbs located throughout the New England states and northeastern New York State. Most of these climbs offer paved surfaces, and gravel sections on a few of the climbs usually do not pose problems for road bikes.

Profiles of the climbs are given, as well as detailed descriptions of surface quality, climbing/descending difficulty, and other bits of info, such as views, race records, etc. All types of climbs are represented here, including mountain summit, gap/notch/pass, long and gradual, short and steep, big and small vertical gain climbs.

I continue to add content to this site. Many NE hillclimbers have sent suggestions for additional content, and many of these suggestions have been recently added to the site. If you have a favorite climb you would like to see added or other comments, please send me an email through the contact link above.

So why are hillclimbers so passionate about climbing? When I first began cycling, I suffered unspeakable pain climbing the modest hills of west Michigan. But I kept going back. My first exposure to climbing was on the main slope of the Cannonsburg ski area.

Mountain Climbs Gaining 1000ft or More

New Hampshire and Maine Mountain Climbs

 

Mount Washington, Gorham, NH

Mt. Washington is the biggest climb in the Northeast. The auto road is mostly paved and rises more than 4720 feet in over 7.5 miles, almost a 12 percent average grade. There is also a 22 percent grade section when you near the top!

The climb is truly rising in a monotonical way, with hardly any flat or downhill parts on the way up to catch your breath. There are some extended sections that have well-groomed gravel surfaces that were no problem for my 23-mm tires.

Only two times each year (four times if you include practice rides), bikes are allowed on this private auto road, and that’s only for the Newton Revenge Race (in July) and for the Mt Washington Bicycle Hill Climb (in August). You need to take the provided auto transportation downhill. At the top, the weather can get downright nasty, even in mid-summer.

I remember that one year, it was in the mid-60s at the base, and 38 and extremely windy when we neared the top, and it even snowed at night! There also were years that the race was entirely canceled which also happened to the Six Gaps Hill Climb in Vermont several times.

Best GPS For Mountain Biking

When it comes to choosing a GPS bike navigation computer, several factors play a role. Let’s take a look at factors such as price, connectivity, the screen, GPS and Mapping options, and 3rd-party apps.

  • Price: Of course, price matters. Not everyone needs a bike computer with lots of functions and options. Often, a simple computer will meet your needs and requirements when climbing hilltops across America. For many cyclists and MTB riders, a compact, simple unit with just a black-and-white display that provides only basic metrics will do. More expensive units, however, have base maps, in-depth power metrics, interval timers, color touchscreens, and more connectivity options than you’ve ever dreamed of. Every bicycle computer, regardless of price, will provide basic data such as speed, time, and distance, but in general, the more you spend, the more functions and features you’ll get.
  • Connectivity: Then there is the element of connectivity. Even most bottom-end computers support Bluetooth or ANT+ connections to heart-rate monitors and cadence or speed sensors. Cheaper units, however, often don’t support power meters. Today, an increasing number of bike computers, also the cheaper models, start facilitating Bluetooth connections to smartphones for notifications, updates, and the like.

Bikes and Equipments

Required Cycling Equipment for safe biking tours

A cycling race may look quite simple and not as dangerous as other races, but for riders to stay safe, there’s a huge list of cycling equipment that they must be aware of and ready to use.

This sport is done on racing bicycles, also referred to as bikes. So among the most crucial things of all for safe races are the bicycles themselves and the bike gears.

Essential as well, besides the racing bicycle and the safety gear, are the riders’ clothes and shoes that should suit the weather, protect the riders from injuries, and avoid discomfort, especially on challenging hill climbs that are often so risky.

Bicycle or Bike?

Racing bicycles are also called bikes. As opposed to motorbikes, these types of bikes are manually driven. The riders power the bikes by pedaling and there’s no electrical or mechanical machinery involved or attached.

Racing bicycles are entirely human-powered and are critically important equipment to the riders. To be able to perform well in a safe manner, having the facing bike in perfect order is key.